Random and Miscellaneous, Science, Women in Science

Should Women Be Doctors?

There is a very interesting article (and debate in the comments) over at the New York Times online about the stresses working women (and men) face when they have to split their time between work and family. This particular essay focuses on female doctors. On one side, it is mentioned that women need to consider how cutting hours to be with family might affect their patients, and on the other side it’s pointed out that perhaps the work stucture itself is archaic, and that changes need to be made to accomodate working parents, no matter their gender. What do you guys think? The link is below.

Should Women Be Doctors? – NYTimes.com.

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Science, Women in Science

Women receive more Ph.D’s than men

According to a study by the National Science Foundation, women earn a majority of doctorates, and have been since 2002. The study, “Doctorate Recipiants from U.S. Universities”, looks at doctorate awards in various groups – citizenship, field, sex, influence, postgraduation trends, and more – and shows that overall, the number doctorate recipients has increased steadily since taking a steep decline in 2002.

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Science, Space and Astronomy, Women in Science

Space Shuttle Endeavour Launches Successfully

The space shuttle Endeavour, after weeks of delays, finally launched successfully this morning at 8:56 AM EDT from Launch Pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center. For its 25th and final mission, Endeavour will spend 16 days in space, which will include a docking at the International Space Station and the release of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), according to Space.Com.

[The AMS is] a $2 billion particle detector that will search for cosmic rays that might help unravel some of our most perplexing cosmic mysteries, such as what makes up the invisible dark matter thought to pervade the universe.

The featured image above is of Endeavours crew. My only issue? WHERE ARE THE WOMEN??? Come on, NASA – this is the second to last shuttle mission, don’t count out the girls. Oh well. At least STS-135 will include mission specialist Sandy Magnus.

Below you can see a picture of Endeavour just after liftoff (credit to collectSPACE.com/Robert Z. Pearlman). Read more about STS-134 at NASA.gov and Space.com.

UPDATE: For another really cool picture, head over to NBC’s PhotoBlog to see a picture of Endeavour from the window of a passenger airplane. The final space shuttle flight, Atlantis STS-135, will liftoff on July 8, 2011.

Final launch of Endeavour, 16 May 2011. Credit: collectSPACE.com/Robert Z. Pearlman

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Science, Space and Astronomy, Women in Science

50th Anniversary of the First American in Space

Yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of Al Shepard’s flight aboard Freedom 7, the first Mercury Program capsule that successfully launched an American into space atop a Redstone rocket. Since 2011 has proven to be such a significant year with regards to human spaceflight, let’s have a look at the last 50+ years of America in space. Below you can take a look at the major events, beginning with the space race with the Soviet Union, all the way to Atlantis’ final flight, set to take place June 28, 2011.

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